Defects in products can occur in three ways. One of those is a warning defect.

Cornell Law School explains that warning defects or defects in marketing occur when there is not sufficient notice from the manufacturer of a product as to hazards possible through the use of the product.

How they work

A warning on a product seeks to educate and inform the end-user about possible risks they could encounter when using the product. These warnings may also alert users about situations in which they use a product that could be dangerous.

All warnings on a product serve a specific purpose to keep you safe. While some may seem funny, manufacturers must cover all possible situations that could lead to liability if you were to suffer an injury. This means that warnings often seem extensive and may include things that you would never think anyone would do with a product, such as using a blow dryer in the bathtub.

Examples of warnings

Warnings can include notices about obvious dangers, such as a notice on a curling iron that says do not touch the metal part when in operation due to the rush of a burn.

Another example is a warning that seeks to inform. These might tell you that using a certain product is known to be dangerous.

Manufacturers may also include warnings for products that explain proper usage and what happens if you misuse a product. A good example of this is warnings on space heaters that tell you not to use them near furniture or curtains due to the risk of fire.